AirRated

AirRated provides a certification for Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). Using the latest sensor technology, we collect detailed information about your IAQ, then grade it based on leading medical research and industry best practice. This process determines your building’s AirScore.


AirScore – the Global Benchmark for Indoor Air Quality


Humidity

What is it?
Relative humidity is the concentration of water vapour present in the air. It’s expressed as a percentage.

Where does it come from?
Respiration and activities such as cooking and washing increase indoor humidity.

Why is it a problem?
Both high and low humidity can directly affect occupant health and comfort, and the presence of biological pollutants such as mould spores. Incidence of absenteeism due to respiratory infections was found to be higher among people working or living in environments with low or high relative humidities.

Humidity
CO2
PM2.5
Temperature
TVOCS

What is it?
Particulate Matter 2.5 is fine particulate matter with a diameter less than 2.5μm. Some common examples are dust, sea salt, ash and vehicle exhaust.

Where does it come from?
Indoors, PM2.5 can come from a number of sources, such as combustion (e.g. heating and cooking), mechanical processes and biological particles (e.g. bacteria and viruses). Simply opening a window isn’t always the best solution for poor IAQ as indoor PM2.5 concentration can also be heavily influenced by both manmade and natural sources from outdoors.

Why is it a problem?
These fine particles can easily penetrate into the lungs and bloodstream, causing irritation of both upper and lower airways, as well as cardiovascular issues: this can can even reduce life expectancy.

Although the World Health Organisation (WHO) has set a guideline of 10μg/m3, there is said to be no safe level of PM2.5.

What is it?
Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a naturally occurring, colourless, odourless gas that makes up 0.04% (400ppm) of the air we breathe.

Where does it come from?
Human and animal respiration and combustion are the main sources of indoor CO2. Occupied indoor concentrations of CO2 are significantly higher than those outdoors.

Why is it a problem?
Studies have shown that elevated levels of CO2 can significantly impair cognitive function and cause up to 11% reduction in productivity. And even though it’s naturally part of the air we breathe, even very low levels of CO2 have been shown to cause adverse health effects, such as aggravating respiratory problems. There is also a recognised connection between elevated indoor CO2 levels and increases in Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms.

What are they?
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are compounds that can become gases or vapours: common examples in our daily lives are acetone, benzene and formaldehyde. TVOCs is a collective term which defines a group of common VOCs

Where does it come from?
VOCs comprise a wide range of chemicals, which may be emitted over periods of weeks or even years from construction and furnishing products such as sealants, paints, cleaning products, and air-cooling refrigerants for building services.

Why is it a problem?
In the short-term, exposure to elevated levels of VOCs can cause adverse health effects such as eye and airway irritation, headaches, dizziness, visual disorders and memory impairment. Long-term they can be even more dangerous, potentially causing damage to the central nervous system and even cancer. There is also an association between higher concentrations of VOCs in indoor air with allergies, asthma, and poor respiratory health.

What is it?
Room temperature describes the range of air temperatures that most people prefer for indoor settings that feel comfortable when wearing typical indoor clothing.

Where does it come from?
Indoor temperature is affected by many variables from occupant density to mechanical ventilation effectiveness and room temperature set point.

Why is it a problem?
Poor thermal comfort can contribute to Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, which include headaches, itchy skin, dry or sore eyes, blocked or runny noses and rashes. Research also indicates that performance of office work is maximised at 21°C to 22°C and for every degree above 25°C productivity is seen to decline by 2%: the same drop has been seen for every degree below 19°C.

What is it?
Relative humidity is the concentration of water vapour present in the air. It’s expressed as a percentage.

Where does it come from?
Respiration and activities such as cooking and washing increase indoor humidity.

Why is it a problem?
Both high and low humidity can directly affect occupant health and comfort, and the presence of biological pollutants such as mould spores. Incidence of absenteeism due to respiratory infections was found to be higher among people working or living in environments with low or high relative humidities.

Certification


An AirScore is a simple and reliable measure for Indoor Air Quality in the built environment. The latest sensor technology is used to monitor five key parameters for IAQ: humidity, temperature, PM2.5, TVOCs and carbon dioxide. Following a three-week monitoring period, an AirScore is determined to give an industry-leading analysis of your building’s indoor health. 

The benefits of an AirScore are plenty. Some examples include attracting occupiers and residents, enhancing marketing campaigns and responding to changing expectations for indoor spaces. Across the board, an AirScore shows consideration for the wellbeing of the people within your indoor environments.


How it works
The three-week AirRated environmental survey gathers information about your building’s Indoor Air Quality. Data from outdoor environmental monitoring stations is also analysed and taken into consideration, as this can have a significant impact on your Indoor Air Quality.

Once the data is collected, our in-house environmental scientists test these data sets against the AirRated scoring system, to generate your building’s AirScore.

The AirScore consists of five fundamental parameters. The three most impactful (PM2.5, CO2 and TVOCs) must each meet a mandatory minimum threshold requirement for 95% of survey hours in order to pass and become ‘Certified’.

A report is then provided with a detailed analysis of your Indoor Air Quality, alongside any suggested remedial actions.

How it works
An AirRated consultant will review and assess your specification and suggest recommendations for improvement and optimisation, all whilst keeping sustainability as a key concern. Along with the fundamental parameters – PM2.5, CO2, temperature, humidity and TVOCs – we will also evaluate other particulates, inorganic gaseous compounds, and pathogens. The design will be evaluated against CIBSE Guide A and the AirRated Global Standards to check minimum requirements are met.

This review process assesses the systems put in place to achieve a healthy building. If all minimum requirements are met, the development will receive an AirScore D&O, which is tiered (Platinum, Gold, Silver and Certified) depending on the grade of specification. The D&O is valid until the scheme’s completion. Upon completion of the project, the building will be eligible for a full AirScore certification.

Tiers
Platinum AirScore
9.0-10


Gold AirScore
8.5-8.9


Silver AirScore
8.1-8.4


Certified AirScore
6.0-8.0

Case studies

The Future Works with AirScore badge

The Future Works

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Manhattan Building with AirScore Badge

Manhattan Centre

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Met Office with AirScore badge

Met Office HQ

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Quintain Case Study

Landsby

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Read the AirRated 2020 report